News

News from the Central Labor Council of Middle Tennessee.

As the COVID-19 vaccine continues its successful rollout out and in-person gatherings with our Union family are beginning to feel safer and sa
The AFL-CIO Executive Council today elected Liz Shuler, a visionary leader and longtime trade unionist, to serve as president of the federation of 56 unions and 12.5 million members. Shuler is the first woman to hold the office in the history of the labor federation. The Executive Council also elected United Steelworkers (USW) International Vice President Fred Redmond to succeed Shuler as secretary-treasurer, the first African American to hold the number two office. Tefere Gebre will continue as executive vice president, rounding out the most diverse team of officers ever to lead the AFL-CIO.

Prominent union leaders of the AFL-CIO and United Auto Workers are publicly condemning President Donald Trump’s supporters for storming the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka called it “one of the greatest assaults on our democracy since the Civil War.” 

Read the full article on CNBC.

The Labor Department on Wednesday released the final version of a rule that could classify millions of workers in industries like construction, cleaning and the gig economy as contractors rather than employees, another step under the Trump administration toward endorsing the business practices of companies like Uber and Lyft. Companies don’t have to pay contractors a minimum wage or overtime and don’t have to pay a share of contractors’ Social Security taxes or contribute to unemployment insurance on their behalf.

Wow, what a year! In the face of incredible adversity, we came together like never before to fight for workers’ rights, build our movement, and show what true solidarity looks like. To take a moment to celebrate all the amazing things our movement has accomplished this year, we put together a short “highlight reel” of some of our favorite moments this year. Let’s build on these victories and happy memories, and keep fighting as we enter a new year with new opportunities!

Happy New Year Friends,

Just a quick note to share some important information.

This December, we organized a Holidary Solidarity Giveback, in which we distributed Kroger grocery cards to Union members and workers who have faced adverse circumstances this year such as layoffs, loss of hours, COVID-19 difficulties, or other hardships. Through this event, we were able to support our union brothers and sisters with over $9,000 of help this holiday season.

We are so appreciative to everyone who stepped up to make this event happen. Thank you for showing your solidarity when your union family needs it the most, and Happy Holidays to all!

This November, Music City Construction Careers’ Apprenticeship Readiness Program held its third class. Participants learned on the job skills, received an introduction to the building trades, became OSHA 10 and CPR/First Aid Certified, and received training on important issues like discrimination and sexual harassment in the workplace (among many other things!). We are so excited to support the members of this class as they graduate our program and begin their next steps into middle-class careers in the Union building trades.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said: “Instead of increasing lifesaving measures aimed at protecting working people at our workplaces, the Trump administration consistently rolled back existing safety and health rules and has failed to move forward on any new safety and health protections. We look forward to working with the new administration to strengthen job safety protections and enforcement; rebuild workplace safety agencies; and prevent worker deaths, injuries and disease.”

This past fall, Transport Workers Union (TWU) member Gregory Harasym began a master’s program in city and regional planning with a concentration in transportation. He intends to examine alternative transportation methods to address community-level health and social injustices; and he hopes to eventually be a specialist in this field, focusing on policy for the Department of Transportation. His career direction changed in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, which deeply impacted his community and left him passionate about helping communities become resilient to future disasters.