Central Labor Council of Nashville and Middle Tennessee

What is the Central Labor Council?

We are more than 20,000 working families in Nashville & Middle TN, represented by more than 40 affiliated local unions and community organizations. We are united for dignity, respect, and fairness on the job and in our community. Join with us because together we're much stronger than we are alone!

The Central Labor Council of Nashville and Middle Tennessee, representing 40 local affiliate labor unions, has announced its endorsements in the Nashville School Board race. They are:

Take Action

Working people are desperate for our leaders to put partisanship aside and do what is right for our health, our economy and our country. Tell your Senator to support the HEROES Act (H.R. 6800) and provide the relief working families need.

The labor movement is working nonstop to ensure workers devastated by the COVID-19 pandemic receive the protections and support needed during this challenging time. Get involved and make sure the needs of working people are heard.

Recent News

Working people are bearing the brunt of this global pandemic and economic crisis. The physical toll, death, pain, and suffering that Oregon’s frontline and essential workers have experienced is unprecedented.

Coupled with the economic collapse that has exacerbated long-term inequities for low wage workers and BIPOC communities, workers are hurting and they need protections.

Daniel DiSalvo asks: “Will Unions Let Schools Reopen?” (op-ed, June 30). Of course! The AFT published our school reopening plan in April. We said it isn’t a question of whether to reopen, but how to do it safely. We need the infrastructure and investment to physically distance, stagger classes, provide personal protective equipment and test, trace and isolate new cases.

Racial disparities in who contracts the virus have played out in big cities like Milwaukee and New York, but also in smaller metropolitan areas like Grand Rapids, Mich., where the Bradleys live. Those inequities became painfully apparent when Ms. Bradley, who is Black, was wheeled through the emergency room. Early numbers had shown that Black and Latino people were being harmed by the virus at higher rates.